Top 100 Dirtiest Web Sites of Summer 2009

Our PC is always under threats since viruses can be transferred in so many ways nowadays, it can be through chat, email, and visiting infected websites. This morning I read this article in one of the leading newspapers here in our country about the top 100 infected web sites identified by Norton.

Here’s what the report says:

Just recently, Symantec has identified the “Dirtiest Web Sites of Summer 2009,” the 100 sites with the most threats detected by site ratings service Norton Safe Web as of August 2009. These sites represent the “worst of the worst” based on the number of threats detected by Norton Safe Web.

It comes as no surprise that 48 percent of the Dirtiest Web Sites are, well, dirty— sites that feature adult content. However, the remainder of the list runs the gamut of subject matter, including sites dedicated to deer hunting, catering, figure skating, legal services, and buying electronics. Malware is the most common threat represented on the Dirtiest list, followed by security risks and browser exploits.

Simply visiting one of these sites, without downloading or clicking on anything in particular, could put you at risk of exposing your computer to infection, and worse, put your identity, personal and financial information into the hands of cybercriminals.

What makes these sites so dirty? For starters, the average number of threats per malicious site rated by Norton Safe Web is 23. Compare that with the average number of threats on the Dirtiest Web Sites list—a staggering 18,000 per site. In fact, 40 of the 100 Dirtiest Web Sites have more than 20,000 threats per site. Being dirty is nothing new for 75 percent of sites on the list, which have distributed malware for more than six months.

Some of the sites identified were: 17ebook.com, clicnews.com, likaraoke.com, teamclouds.com, sportsmansclub.net and a lot more.

To find the dirt, Norton Safe Web crawls the Web and performs analysis of millions of Web sites, and benefits from a network of more than 20 million Norton Community Watch members that automatically submit suspicious URLs for analysis in real-time.

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